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Author Topic: Shaykh al-Akbar Hazrat Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi (rehmatullah alaih)  (Read 3978 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: April 05, 2010, 02:16:22 PM »

Shaykh al-Akbar Sidi Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi al-'Hatimi al-Andalusi (rehmatullah alaih) (d. 636/1221)

The Venerated Qutb, Sidi Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi al-‘Hatimi, known throughout the Islamic world simply as the "Greatest Master" (al-Shaykh al-Akbar) as his master Sidi Abu Madyan al-Ghawt (d. 594/1179) used to call him, is acknowledged to be one of the most important Sufi teachers in the Islamic world. A vastly prolific writer and visionary, he is generally known as the prime exponent of the concept of the Unity of Being (wahdat al-wujud), even though that particular term, by which his teachings came later to be designated, was hardly used in his own milieu. His emphasis, as with any mystic, lay rather on the true potential of the human being and the path to realizing that potential, which reaches its completion in the Complete Man (al-Insan al-Kamil). Shaykh al-Akbar wrote at least 300 works, ranging from minor treatises to the huge thirty-seven-volume Meccan Illuminations (al-Futuhat al-Makkiya) and the quintessence of his teachings, the Bezels of Wisdom (Fusus al-Hikam). Approximately 110 works are known to have survived in verifiable manuscripts, some 18 in Shaykh al-Akbar's own hand. He exerted an unparalleled influence, not only upon his immediate circle of friends and disciples, many of whom were considered spiritual masters in their own right, but also on succeeding generations, affecting the whole course of subsequent spiritual thought and practice in the Arabic-, Turkish-, and Persian-speaking worlds. In recent years his writings have also increasingly become the subject of interest and study in the West, leading to the establishment of an international academic society in his name.

Shaykh al-Akbar's thought is characterized by a profound visionary capacity, coupled with a remarkable intellectual insight into human experience and a thorough knowledge of all the traditional sciences. It has been tempting for scholars to characterize him as a mystical philosopher, a formulation that is rather at odds with his own teachings on the limitations of philosophical thinking. He was as much at home with Quranic and hadith scholarship as with medieval philology and letter symbolism, philosophy, alchemy, and cosmology. He could write with equal facility in prose or poetry, and utilized the polysemous ambiguity of the Arabic language to great effect—the characteristic resonances of rhymed prose (saj’), which are to be found in the Quran, abound in his works. The complexity of his writings makes him one of the most demanding of authors, and difficult to comprehend, leading some Islamic scholars to oppose and even reject his positions. Among his admirers, his writing was always considered to be the most elevated exposition of mystical thought in Islam, and therefore unsuitable for the untrained mind. He combines a detailed architecture of spiritual experience, theory, and practice, with descriptions of the attainments of other masters he met and of his own personal visions, insights, and dreams. It is his propensity to recount stories from his own direct experience, primarily in order to make a teaching point, that allows readers to gain such a detailed insight into his inner world, and also allows us to reconstruct his life and times with some accuracy.

Shaykh al-Akbar’s life
Born on July 28, 1165, in Murcia, Muslim Spain, Abu Abdellah Sidi Mohammed b. Ali b. Mohammed Ibn Arabi al-‘Hatimi al-Ta’i al-Andalusi al-Maghribi, as he signs himself (often shortened to simply Ibn Arabi), was brought up from the age of seven in Seville, the provincial capital of the Moroccan Almohad Empire during the heyday of Andalusian Muslim culture. His father served as a professional soldier in the sultan's entourage, and for a time the son seemed destined to follow in his footsteps. Contrary to the romantic picture painted by later writers, the family was well-off, but neither noble nor very religious. He seems to have been blessed with an extraordinary visionary capacity from a very young age, and the seminal experience of his youth took place when he was about fifteen or sixteen years old. Without having had any formal training and apparently under the impulsion of an irresistible inner demand, he undertook a retreat alone just outside Seville, probably in the ruins of the old Roman city of Italica, where he had a remarkable dream-vision of the Prophets, Sidna Isa (Jesus, peace be upon him), Sidna Musa (Moses, peace be upon him), and the Chieftain of the Universe: Sidna Mohammed ibn Abdellah (peace and blessing be upon them). According to his own testimony, each of them is said to have given him a piece of advice: Jesus, whom he referred to as his first teacher, exhorted him to follow the spiritual life, and instructed him to practice renunciation and detachment; Moses, whom Shaykh al-Akbar regarded as epitomizing the reception of divine inspiration, promised that he would be given knowledge by God directly, without any intermediary; and, finally, Sidna Mohammad, who rescued him from a host of assailants, told him: "Hold fast to me and you will be safe". As a consequence of this instruction, Shaykh al-Akbar says, he began his study of the Tradition of the Prophet  (al-‘hadith al-sharif).

 

This triple vision also had one other direct result: the great philosopher, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), who was nearing the end of his life in Cordoba, asked to meet him, and their celebrated meeting included a most extraordinary exchange, touching on the very nature of the spiritual quest: in response to Ibn Rushd's question about whether mystical illumination produces the same results as rational inquiry, Shaykh al-Akbar replied: "Yes and no, and between the yes and the no spirits take wing from their matter, and necks are separated from their bodies", leaving the philosopher dumbfounded. This response not only indicates Shaykh al-Akbar's understanding of the gulf between the philosophical and the mystical, between intellectual reflection and spiritual retreat, but also his appreciation of how mystical thought can include and accommodate apparently contradictory notions.

 

Within two years, Shaykh al-Akbar had irrevocably dedicated himself to a rigorous spiritual life, turning his back on the military career that his father had wanted him to pursue, and entrusting everything he possessed into his father's keeping. From this time he began to frequent other spiritual masters. An account of the many Sufi teachers, male and female, that he met in Seville, Cordoba, and other major cities of Andalusia and the Maghreb is given in one of his most accessible books, The Spirit of Holiness (Ruh al-quds fi munasahat al-nafs), which provides a wonderful insight into spiritual teaching in his time. Some of his teachers were poor and illiterate and referred to Shaykh al-Akbar as their spiritual son, like his first master, al-‘Uryani, or one of his female teachers in Seville, Fatima bint Ibn al-Muthanna, who was already ninety-six years old when they met and appeared superficially as a simpleton, "though she would have replied that he who knows not his Lord is the real simpleton". Others, such as Sidi 'Abderrahman al-Tamimi al-Fasi (d. 1206) and Sidi Abu Yaqub ibn Yakhlaf al-Qumi al-Abbasi were more apparently learned, and introduced Shaykh al-Akbar to the teachings of the Moroccan poles:  Moulay Boushayb as-Sarya(d. 561/1146), Sidi Abu Yaaza Yalnur  (d. 572/1157), and Sidi Abu Madyan al-Ghawt (d. 594/1179), and to central texts of Sufism. Shaykh al-Akbar reports in Ruh al-Quds fi munasahat al-nafs,
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Auliya Naksh Kudrat Pe Lakho Salam, Panjatan Ki Sayadat Pe lakho Salam,
Fazl-e-Rehman Se Azmat Nabi Ki jo Sikhi, Is Mujadid Ki Jidad Pe Lakho Salam,
Qadri,Naqshbandi Wa Chishti Gulon Ki, Karam Pash Nighat Pe Lakho Salam,
Jise Bibi Zohra Banaye Hai Beta, Fazl-e-Rehman Ki Nisbat Pe Lakho salam.
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« on: April 05, 2010, 02:16:22 PM »

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mazhar rehmani
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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2010, 02:18:26 PM »

“Our master and imam Abu Yaqub ben Yakhlaf al-Qumi al-Abbasi —may God be pleased with him—had been a companion of Abu Madyan and had met several of the men of God in his country. He lived for a time in Egypt and married in Alexandria… He was offered the governorship of Fez, but declined it. He possessed such a sure knowledge of the spiritual way that Abu Madyan who was the founder and expounder of this way in the Maghrib, said of him: Abu Yaqub is like a safe harbour for a ship.' He was generous, much given to dhikr (remembrance of God), and gave alms in secret. He honoured the poor and humbled the rich. I was obedient to him and was educated by him—and what an education it was... He had a powerful spiritual will and for the most part followed the way of the malamatiya. Seldom was he seen without an expression of total concentration on his face. But whenever he saw a poor man, his face would light up with joy… Whenever I sat before him, or before any other spiritual master, I would tremble like a leaf in the wind, my voice would desert me, and I would be unable to move my limbs. People would notice this. And if the master were in dulgent to me, and sought to put me at my ease, it only increased my awe and reverence for him. This master had love for me, but concealed it by showing favour to others, and by displaying a distant manner towards me, commending what others had to say while taking me to task. He went so far in this, that my companions who studied with me under his charge, began to think little of my spiritual gifts. And yet I alone of the whole group, as the master later said, reached the goal. Of my many experiences with Abu Yaqub, the following is worthy of mention. I must first explain that at the time concerned I did not yet know the Epistle of al-Qushayri (a fundamental work of Islamic mysticism). I was unaware that anyone had written about this spiritual way, and did not even know what the expression Sufism meant. One day the master mounted his horse, and bade me and one of my companions follow him to Muntabar, a mountain that was about an hour's ride from Seville. As soon as the city gate was opened, my companion and I set out on foot. My companion carried in his hand a copy of AI-Qushayri's Epistle, of which as I have said, I knew nothing. We climbed the mountain and at the top we found our master, who, with a servant, had gone ahead of us. He tethered his horse, and we entered a  Masjid at the top of the mountain in order to pray. After the prayer, we sat with our backs towards the prayer-niche (mihrab). The master handed me Qushayri's Epistle and told me to read from it. I was unable, however, to utter a single word. My awe of him was so great that the book even fell from my hands. Then he told my companion to read it, and he expounded on what was read until it was time for the afternoon prayer, which we said. Then the master said: 'Let us now return to town.' He mounted his horse, and I ran alongside him, holding on to his stirrup. Along the way he talked to me of the virtues and miracles of Abu Madyan. I was all ears, and forgot myself entirely, keeping my eyes fixed on his face the whole time. Suddenly he looked at me and smiled and, spurring his horse, made me run even more quickly in order to keep up with him. I succeeded in doing so. Finally he stopped, and said to me: 'Look and see what thou hast left behind thee.' I looked back and saw that the way along which we had come was full of thorn bushes that reached as high as my tunic, and that the ground was also covered with thorns. He said: 'Look at thy feet!' I looked at them and saw on them no trace of the thorns. Took at thy garments!' On them too I found no trace. Then he said: 'That comes from the grace engendered by our talking about Abu Madyan—may God be pleased with him—so persevere, my son, on the spiritual path!' Thereupon he spurred his horse and left me behind.


read the full biography at the link below:

http://www.dar-sirr.com/Ibn-Arabi.html















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Auliya Naksh Kudrat Pe Lakho Salam, Panjatan Ki Sayadat Pe lakho Salam,
Fazl-e-Rehman Se Azmat Nabi Ki jo Sikhi, Is Mujadid Ki Jidad Pe Lakho Salam,
Qadri,Naqshbandi Wa Chishti Gulon Ki, Karam Pash Nighat Pe Lakho Salam,
Jise Bibi Zohra Banaye Hai Beta, Fazl-e-Rehman Ki Nisbat Pe Lakho salam.
[/b]
plz visit : http://hazratfazlerehman.com
Aulia-e-hind.com
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2010, 02:18:26 PM »

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masood
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« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2010, 03:47:16 PM »

For More Dargahs in Syria Visit
http://aulia-e-hind.com/dargah/Intl/Syria.htm
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